Trippy Technology


Founder of Match.com Lost His Girlfriend on Match.com - Gary Kremen saw potential in online dating, but the world was yet to be convinced, so he purchased the domain Match.com in 1994 for $2,500, when only about five percent of Americans were online. Kreman said that he made the website so that it would be welcoming to women and designed the system around them. As people still had more negative connotations regarding online dating, he worked on a solution to the problem. Kremen asked everyone in the company to create a profile on the site. This even included his girlfriend at the time, even though they were in a relationship. This trick helped the company grow the number of users, but it came at a cost Kremen. His girlfriend met another man on the site, and left Kremen for him. Kremen has said that it was painful, but it showed him that the site worked.


Facebook Has Better Face Detection Software Than the FBI - According to statistics released by both the FBI and Facebook, Facebook’s proprietary facial analysis software is able to accurately identify a person in a photo 98% of the time. This software is significantly more accurate than that used with the FBI, known as Next Generation Identification, which lists their own software as having an accuracy rating of only 85%. The main reason stated for this discrepancy is that the FBI very often only have a single photo to go on to identify a person such as a driver’s license photo or a mug shot, all from a very large database. Facebook, meanwhile, often has hundreds of pictures every person using the site, from multiple angles, contained within a much smaller database, allowing them to build a comprehensive image on an individual’s features.


Clocks in Grand Central Station All Run a Minute Fast – At train stations all over the world, there are people constantly rushing to catch a train they could have easily caught if they planned a little better. Since this can lead to accidents, Grand Central Station has a unique way of using Social Engineering to slow people down; all their clocks run one minute fast. Though a minute doesn’t seem like a long time, it has the subconscious effect of slowing people down. The extra minute makes it feel like you have a little more time than you actually do, causing you to rush slightly less. The conductors will also pull out of the station one minute late after their trains' posted departure times, to keep up the illusion and to give travelers the extra moment to get to the train without hurting themselves or someone else. As a result, even with approximately 750,000 people passing through it daily, Grand Central Station is statistically one of the safest stations in the world.


Wine Powered Processors - In September of 2013, at the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco, an Intel engineer demonstrated a new project with an unusual manner in which to power a microprocessor. The engineer poured red wine into a glass containing circuitry on two metal boards, allowing ions to travel between the two surfaces. The processor then sensed, communicated, and controlled a 3D flower on an e-ink display. The goal of the demonstration was to show Intel's progress in developing low-power chips, powered by microwatts, with a thousand times less power than the watts that power a traditional PC. Intel mentioned how future devices could even be powered with the heat of our skin, meaning a dedicated power source and battery wouldn't technically be needed. Intel is hoping that truly low-power components can usher in a new era of truly personal computing, with wearable computers. Most importantly, the wine was an inexpensive yet bold and moderately tannic California Charles Shaw Cabernet Sauvignon, which the community reviews as a good vin ordinaire.



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